Domestic Violence Immersive Experience

Exterior of house from In Someone Else's Shoes domestic violence immersive experience by Helo

THE HIDDEN TRUTH ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

HELO worked directly with Santander and their Chief Creative Director Icaro Doria to create this powerful important experience.

April, 2019 – October, 2019

> Experience Director Annie Saunders

> Founder/Executive Producer Justin Moore-Lewy

> Executive Producer James Okumura

> Experiential Producer Megan Kingery

I did not do any work on this. The women in this picture did.  It was, however, my first day on location in an official HELO role.  I posted it because:

  1. It is a stunning example of the power of experiential work.
  2. It is a great illustration of why I have joined this amazing group of humans.
  3. It is the type of work we should all be doing.
Five women who helped create the domestic violence immersive experience In Someone Else's Shoes

During National Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October, Santander Bank is joined leading domestic violence organizations for an initiative that aims to build respect through understanding for survivors through a live activations.

Many of the survivors of abuse face financial challenges that make leaving abusive situations more difficult, which is why Santander has partnered with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) and the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV). Together, they will bring to life the financial abuse survivors often encounter through an immersive experience open to the public in New York City, as well as videos telling individual stories of financial abuse.

The ‘In Someone Else’s Shoes’ interactive exhibit in New York spotlighted the financial hardships of an abusive home. The stand-alone house, built in partnership with domestic violence and financial abuse experts, gives guests a glimpse into systemic and structural factors that enable a domestic violence situation and make it difficult to escape.

The program features a micro-lending program for survivors that includes credit-building opportunities as well as access to financial literacy resources.

Traveling through the home you hear the soundtrack to this nightmare that has so many people trapped.  At the end counselors provided help and shared material that could help.

When I finished the experience I was so moved.  My wife struggled with many of these problems in her past and I was stunned to find people doing the work to try and make a difference.  What follows is a video that captures this all too frequent tragedy.